ECRN Rep Profiles 2017

 

Gail Adams-Hutcheson

University: The University of Waikato

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Online: LinkedIn, ResearchGate

About: Gail is currently a teaching fellow at the University of Waikato geography programme. She is a cultural geographer who teaches in the areas of gender, embodiment and the human dimensions of climate change. She completed her PhD in 2014 based on the stories of Cantabrians who relocated to the Waikato following the 2010/2011 earthquakes and aftershocks. Extending this work, Gail is now researching experiences of 50/50 (herd-owning) sharemilkers in the Waikato region, bringing together geographies of transience and mobilities. Gail has a mentor role within the early-career researcher network after being a member throughout her PhD. Her latest article is on spatialising skin: pushing the boundaries of trauma geographies in Emotion, Space & Society.

 

 

Tegan Baker

University: The University of Waikato

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Online: LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/tegan-baker-27a261a6/

About: Tegan is in the third year of her PhD candidature at the University of Waikato and has been a member of the NZGS early-career researcher network since 2013. Her PhD research is focused on how long-distance football fans create senses of home in relation to the club they support. Through conducting interviews, participant sensings and go-alongs with fans of predominantly British clubs, this project highlights alternative ways of creating and examining notions of home across distance. Tegan is also interested in the importance of emotion, memory and identity inherent in the practice of being a football fan and the tensions between this and the hyper-commercialised landscape of contemporary football.   

 

 

Christina Bright

University: The University of Otago

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About: Chrissy is a PhD Student at the University of Otago, based in Dunedin. She is a physical geographer, studying hydrology. Currently Chrissy’s research is focused on forest hydrology, and understanding how nutrient cycles, and the export of nutrients in both dissolved and particulate forms changes following land disturbance from forest clearance. Utilising environmental tracers, and principles of biogeochemistry, the research will contribute to gaining an understanding of how forest ecosystems function during the disturbance phase of a plantation forest’s cycle. Currently Chrissy’s PhD work is focused on refining methods for determining suspended sediment turbidity relationships, and what affect particulate organic matter as a portion of total suspended material has on these relationships. Chrissy is also involved in a number of research projects being carried out over Otago, and is principally interested in land use change hydrology, and how we monitor the affects of land disturbance caused by land use change on our water ways. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sam Mehrtens

University: University of Otago

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Online: LinkedIn

About: Sam is a Master of Arts student and representative on the NZGS ERC rep for Otago and has research interests in education and IT in developing countries, with a particular focus in Papua New Guinea, after a years’ work with Volunteer Service Abroad. 

  

 

Andrew Neverman

University: Massey University

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Online: ResearchGate (https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Andrew_Neverman), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewneverman)

About: Andrew is a PhD student in the Physical Geography Group at Massey University. His PhD work focuses on the role of bedload transport (substrate stability) for periphyton (algae) management. The main aims of his project are to identify the thresholds for incipient motion in gravel-bed rivers as a means of setting effective hydrological limits for managing excess periphyton. He is focused on using advancements in sensing and monitoring methods to improve the approach to identifying initiation thresholds in natural channels. Andrew’s main interests are focused around the tools and methods used to obtain geomorphic, hydrological, and ecological data in the field, with a focus on GeoInformatics, remote sensing, UAVs, and GIS. 

 

 

Swati Shah

University: University of Otago

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Online: LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/swati-shah-2188a346/)

About: Swati is a PhD scholar in Department of Geography at University of Otago and her research problem pertains to the stigma of surrogacy faced by Indian commissioning parents. With booming market and ambiguous laws on surrogacy, India presents an interesting case where Indian commissioning parents are often ignored leading to half-baked picture of surrogacy. Swati got opportunity to work with different frontiers such as Food and Nutrition, Health and Communication, Gender and Agriculture, Urban Agriculture and Edible Greening. Before joining Otago, she worked as a Research Fellow at Centre of Women at national institute run by Ministry of Agriculture Govt. of India where she completed three research project assessing government policies impact on social and economic status of women. The cognizance of manifold experiences led her to appreciate the importance of defining people’s health and wellbeing. 

 

 

 

James Veitch

University: Massey University

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Online:  LinkedIn, Researchgate

About: James is an international PhD student in the Institute of Agriculture and Environment at Massey University, having previously obtained both a BSc (Hons) in Geography and an MSc in Climatic and Environmental Change from Coventry University in the United Kingdom. The focus of his PhD is to investigate the palaeoenvironmental evolution of the Ruamahanga River catchment in the lower North Island, New Zealand. Specifically, the research will focus on establishing the drivers of sedimentation with the Wairarapa as part of a detailed chronology of environmental change throughout the Holocene. His research interests extend beyond this and also include: palaeoenvironmental application of Ostracoda; historical and future impacts of climate change on weather patterns and natural hazards; and the application of GIS to spatial data.