ECRN Reps



 

Gail Adams-Hutcheson

 

Institution:           The University of Waikato

 

Role:                     Mentor/support; Media outreach

 

Email:                   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Online:                  LinkedIn - ResearchGate - ORCID iD https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4683-6730   

                        

About:

Gail is currently a teaching fellow at the University of Waikato geography programme. She is a cultural geographer who teaches in the areas of gender, embodiment and the human dimensions of climate change. She completed her PhD in 2014 based on the stories of Cantabrians who relocated to the Waikato following the 2010/2011 earthquakes and aftershocks. She has recently completed work on the National Science Challenge: Resilience to Nature’s Challenges investigating resilience governance. Gail has a mentor role within the early-career researcher network after being a member throughout her PhD. Her latest article ‘Flourishing in fragile teaching and learning spaces: feminist geographies of care and mentoring” in Gender, Place & Culture examines the importance of academic mentor roles. Gail has been awarded the 2019 NZGS Emerging Researcher in Geography Award and a University of Waikato 2019 Divisional Teaching Excellence Award.

 


 

Brendon Blue 

 

Role:                     National Co-Representative

 

Institution:           The University of Auckland

 

Email:                   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Online:                 University profile - ORCID iD  http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4310-4489 - Google Scholar  

                        

About:

Brendon is a research fellow in the School of Environment at the University of Auckland/Te Whare Wānanga o Tāmaki Makaurau. After a circuitous path involving bioscience, psychology and geomorphology, Brendon has found his calling studying interactions between people and landscapes. His work focuses on the politics of conservation and restoration science, seeking to understand how visions of positive environmental change are created, negotiated and enacted. After working with river science and understandings of river ‘health’ for his PhD, completed in 2018, Brendon is embarking on a new project examining efforts to make Aotearoa New Zealand predator free.

 


 

Pascarn Dickinson 

 

Institution:           Victoria University of Wellington

 

Email:                   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Online:                 LinkedIn - University Profile

 

 

About:

Pascarn is the Senior Tutor for Geography in the School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences at Victoria University of Wellington.  While his current role focuses on teaching first year Human Geography and Environmental Studies, Pascarn maintains an interest in research.  His Masters research (also at Victoria University of Wellington) concluded in 2018 and focused on identifying and explaining the interactions between wellbeing and wellbeing inequality within New Zealand wards, cities and regions.  His research interests include broadly geographies of subjective wellbeing, inequality, and (increasingly) issues faced by undergraduate students on and off campus.

 


 

Sarah Edwards

Institution:       Lincoln University

Email:               This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Online:             https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8668-7602

 

About:

Sarah is a lecturer in the Department of Environmental Management at Lincoln University. She is the academic co-ordinator of postgraduate qualifications in Environmental Management, and teaches core courses in the department’s undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes. Sarah completed her PhD in Environmental Management in 2014. Her thesis explored the use of Actor-Network Theory to examine research into genetically modified organisms in New Zealand, with a particular focus on the spatial complexities of the “containment facilities” used for this research. She has also conducted research on urban risk and resilience in the context of the Canterbury earthquakes, including a recently completed project within National Science Challenge 11: Building better homes, towns and cities. 

 


 

Nicholas Kirk

 

Institution:           Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research

 

Email:                   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Online:                 Google Scholar - https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7029-592X  


About:

Nick is currently an environmental social researcher at Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research, based in Lincoln. He is an environmental geographer with a research focus on natural resource governance. In 2015 he completed his PhD at Lincoln University on the topic of Environment Canterbury’s management of freshwater between 1990 and 2010. Nick began working at Manaaki Whenua in 2017 after completing postdoctoral research at the Universitat de Girona in Catalonia, Spain. He is currently researching the benefits of collaborative community-based resource management, the water-food-energy nexus, and climate change adaptation in rural New Zealand. 

 


 

           

 

Omid Khazaeian

 

Institution:           Victoria University of Wellington

 

Email:                   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Online:                 https://www.linkedin.com/in/omid-khazaeian-6a533976/

     

 About:

Omid is a research student in Geographic Information Science (GIS) at Victoria University of Wellington. He is interested in spatial mobility including transportation and telecommunications. With a background in urban and regional planning, he did some research on the impact of digital communications on urban spatial structure and its implications for current planning systems. He is currently working on logistic and GIS modelling of transportation networks to measure the impact of carparks in a daily commute. His research projects received several international awards including Bill Ogden Memoria Prize (Regional Studies Association), German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) scholarship, Faculty Strategic Research Grant (Victoria University of Wellington). Omid is representing ECRN in Wellington branch.

 

 

 Kiko Qin

Institution: Lincoln University

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

About:

Kiko is currently a PhD student at Lincoln University. She is interested in the cultural influence of people’s leisure behaviour. Her PhD research focuses on the impact of the cross-cultural environment on outdoor recreation participation by Mainland Chinese students in New Zealand. During Kiko’s Master’s study in China, she participated in projects on the economic revitalization in rural area of Hubei Province via tourism development. Her research topic involved traditional cultural extraction, preservation and integration in tourism planning, specifically biking routes design. Kiko also has more than 10 years of teaching experience at Wuhan University of Engineering Science, which included topics such as traditional culture and tourism. 

 

Salene Schloffel-Armstrong

Institution: The University of Auckland

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Online: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3080-1098

About:

Salene is currently a PhD candidate and tutor in social and urban geography in the School of Environment at the University of Auckland. She is currently working on a doctorate investigating the changing role of the public library in the contemporary city. This research interrogates the trend of newly constructed flagship library branches, using Tūranga in Christchurch as a key case study. With earlier postgraduate work including an autoethnography of walking in Auckland, her research interests centre around embodied experiences of urban space as connected to wider political processes.


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